Easter Lily

THE EASTER LILY HOLIDAY TRADITION

Each holiday is marked by cherished traditions that bring joy, comfort, and warmth, and provide continuity from one generation to the next. Easter has its share of traditions: egg decorations and hunts; gift baskets and chocolate bunnies, sunrise church services, parades, and, of course, the Easter Lily. For many, the beautiful trumpet-shaped white flowers symbolize purity, virtue, innocence, hope and life – the spiritual essence of Easter.

History, mythology, literature, poetry and the world of art are rife with stories and images that speak of the beauty and majesty of the elegant white flowers. Dating back to Biblical lore, the lily is mentioned numerous times in the Bible. One of the most famous Biblical references is in the Sermon on the Mount, when Christ told his listeners: “Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they toil not, neither do they spin; and yet….. Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these.”

Often called the “white-robed apostles of hope,” lilies were found growing in the Garden of Gethsemane after Christ’s agony. Tradition has it that the beautiful white lilies sprung up where drops of Christ’s sweat fell to the ground in his final hours of sorrow and deep distress. Churches continue this tradition at Easter time by banking their alters and surrounding their crosses with masses of Easter Lilies, to commemorate the resurrection of Jesus Christ and hope of life everlasting.

Since the beginning of time, lilies have played significant roles in allegorical tales concerning the sacrament of motherhood. Ancient fables tell us the lily sprang from the milk of Hera, the mythological Queen of Heaven.

The pure white lily has long been closely associated with the Virgin Mary. In early paintings, the Angel Gabriel is pictured extending to the Virgin Mary a branch of pure white lilies, announcing that she is to be the mother of the Christ Child. In other paintings, saints are pictured bringing vases full of white lilies to Mary and the infant Jesus.

The legend is told that when the Virgin Mary’s tomb was visited three days after her burial, it was found empty save for bunches of majestic white lilies. Early writers and artists made the lily the emblem of the Annunciation, the Resurrection of the Virgin: the pure white petals signifying her spotless body and the golden anthers her soul glowing with heavenly light.

It seems the thirteenth-century Barthololmeus Anglicus had this in mind when he wrote: ‘The Lily is an herbe with a white flower; and though the leaves of the floure be white, yet within shineth the likeness of gold.” So goes the saying, ‘To gild a lily is to attempt, foolishly, to improve on perfection.” To many artists and poets it seemed that, if any flower could have one, the lily had a soul.

In yet another expression of womanhood, lilies had a significant presence in the paradise of Adam and Eve. Tradition has it that when Eve left the Garden of Eden she shed real tears of repentance, and from those remorseful tears sprung up lilies. The spiritual principle held here is that true repentance is the beginning of beauty.

A mark of purity and grace throughout the ages, the regal white lily is a fitting symbol of the greater meaning of Easter. Gracing millions of homes and churches, the flowers embody joy, hope and life. Whether given as a gift or enjoyed in your own home, the Easter Lily serves as a beautiful reminder that Easter is a time for rejoicing and celebrating.

The following poem by Louise Lewin Matthews captures the spiritual essence of the Easter Lily:

Easter morn with lilies fair
Fills the church with perfumes rare,
As their clouds of incense rise,
Sweetest offerings to the skies.
Stately lilies pure and white
Flooding darkness with their light,
Bloom and sorrow drifts away,
On this holy hallow’d day.
Easter Lilies bending low
in the golden afterglow,
Bear a message from the sod
To the heavenly towers of God.

-Louise Lewin Matthews

Written and posted by http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/plantanswers/publications/lily/lily.html

Did you know?

Billy Heroman’s is responsible for all of those beautiful planters you see around Baton Rouge.  Our plant personnel takes care of Airports, Doctor’s Offices, Malls, Downtown Buildings, etc.  Not only do they plant them… They also water, trim and maintain them so the customer doesn’t have to worry.

Poinsettia Care – How do I take care of this thing?

Poinsettia care begins with proper light, water, and temperature conditions. During the holidays, while in full bloom, they typically enjoy semi-cool, humid locations in bright, indirect light with plenty of moisture. Poinsettia plants should be watered thoroughly; taking care not to drown them by ensuring adequate drainage is available. Likewise, avoid letting them sit in water-filled saucers, which can lead to root rot. Adding plants nearby can help increase humidity levels in dry rooms, as will humidifiers.

Once flower bracts have fallen, you have the option of discarding the plant or keeping it an additional year. For those choosing to continue with poinsettia care, decrease regular watering to allow the plant to dry out some. However, don’t let it dry out completely. Also, relocate the poinsettia plant to a cool, dark area until spring or around April.

Orchid Care

BHFPhalo

Orchids are easy care plants that typically bloom for three to ten weeks. With a little attention, they will last for years.  Place your orchid in bright indirect light away from drafts. An ideal temperature range is 65 to 85 degrees.  Avoid any temperature extremes or placing orchids near heating/cooling vents.  Orchids need to be watered every 5 days, and they need perfect drainage. Feed orchids once a month with a liquid fertilizer.

DO NOT LEAVE ORCHIDS IN STANDING WATER!

To re-bloom an orchid, cut just below the lowest flower and 1/4 inch above the next node.

Orchids prefer to be root bound and repotting is only necessary every three years.

Croton Care

Croton
Instructions
  1. Step 1

    Give crotons several hours of bright, direct sunlight per day. The more light the plant receives, the more colorful the leaves will be. Grown in inadequate light, the leaves will be mostly green with yellow veins. Leaves may also fall off in low light.

  2. Step 2

    Place plant on a tray of pebbles to give it the little humidity boost it needs. Water will be absorbed by the pebbles and create humidity as it evaporates.

  3. Step 3

    Keep the potting mix moist, but be careful not to allow water to stand on top of soil. Reduce watering in the winter, allowing the top of the soil to dry out between waterings.

  4. Step 4

    Prune branches in early spring if plant outgrows its space or if a bushier plant is desired. Plant will branch where pruning takes place. Croton plants may get tall and spindly without pruning.

  5. Step 5

    Take care to watch for spider webbing on leaves. Red spider mites commonly infest croton plants. They are hard to see with the naked eye, but will leave webs. Remove infested leaves and apply pesticide to plant. Left alone, red spider mites will kill an entire plant, so action must be taken.

How do I care for those mum plants?

EHOW tells us….

Instructions.

Step 1Water the mums regularly. Soak the mums until water runs out through the holes in the pot bottom. After the initial soaking, water daily or until soil is moist. Don’t allow the potted soil to dry out, as this will harm the plant.

Step 2Keep mums in natural light or in the direct sun, whether indoors or out. Mum plants need plenty of sun for proper growth. Keep them away from night lighting, as this disturbs their flowering cycle.

Step 3Deadhead spent blooms. After flowers begin to wilt and die, pluck them from the plant at the base of the flower. Leave on any buds, blooming flowers and leaves.

Step 4Allow the mum plants to go dormant over the winter. Keep them outside once the blooms die, and mound the pots with dried leaves or garden refuse to prevent premature freezing.

Step 5Prune the mum plants in the late winter or early spring before new growth begins. Cut back stems to about 12 to 18 inches or shorter for bushier plants.

Step 6Water mum plants in the spring as new growth begins and color returns to the plants. Keep them well watered throughout the spring, fertilizing once a week for the first couple months and then ceasing fertilization once blooms are present.

http://www.ehow.com/how_4443173_care-potted-mum-plants.html